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Showing posts from July, 2024

News: Encore Performance of "If I Did, You Deserved It" on 7/27

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Laurizarry will present once again If I Did, You Deserved It , written by Jess Lauricello and directed by Casey Kelly, as an encore performance from the 2024 Queerly Festival with FRIGID New York at UNDER St. Marks (94 St Marks Pl, New York, NY 10009) on Saturday, June 27 at 10:30pm.  A party seemingly thrown by no one that you definitely wouldn’t have been invited to full of people that you hate, followed by eternal damnation! Come judge other people for fun. Don’t worry, you totally have every right to. If I Did, You Deserved It , produced by new Gen Z theatre company Laurizarry and directed by Casey Kelly, is a new play from award-losing playwright Jess Lauricello that’s probably a comedy. It was FRIGID New York’s Show of the Month of June 2024 and was described as “snappy and vibrant” and “quick-witted” by Theatre Beyond Broadway . Tickets (up to $25 on a sliding scale) are available for advance purchase at  www.frigid.nyc . The performance will run approximately 60 minutes. The ca

Review: "Too Much of a Good Thing" Busts Out at Playhouse 46

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Too Much of a Good Thing Written, directed, and performed by Rachel Redleaf Presented by RAR Entertainment at Playhouse 46 at St. Luke's 308 W 46th St., Manhattan, NYC July 8-18, 2024 Rachel Redleaf. Photo courtesy of Rachel Redleaf. If the number of slang terms for something is proportional to the space it takes up in the cultural imaginary, then, as the opening of actor, singer, and comedian Rachel Redleaf's coruscating solo show Too Much of a Good Thing suggests, women's breasts boast quite a footprint. That this video introduction is delivered by a puppet named Rachel Too quickly establishes the expert tonal balance that the show strikes, taking an overwhelmingly comedic approach to Redleaf's sometimes traumatic experiences as a woman carrying the weight, literal and otherwise, of very large breasts. Too Much of a Good Thing is currently part of Playhouse 46's Turn The Lights On! Festival, which presents, in collaboration with FRIGID New York and the New Y

Review: "A Drag Is Born" Doesn't Need Words to Speak Volumes

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A Drag is Born Created and performed by Edu Díaz Directed by Rachel Resnik Presented at Playhouse 46 at St. Luke's 308 W 46th St., Manhattan, NYC July 6-14, 2024 Edu Díaz in A Drag Is Born . Photo by José Botella Films Simone de Beauvoir famously writes in The Second Sex , "One is not born, but rather becomes, woman" (Knopf, 2010, p. 283). While drag itself emphasizes gender as a masquerade, Edu Díaz's delightful solo show A Drag is Born suggests that in the case of a drag artist, perhaps one is both born and made. The show, which has won multiple awards at the Orlando and NYC Fringe Festivals, sees queer theater artist and Fulbright winner Díaz (he/him/él), a New York-based native of the Canary Islands, take a transformative, if at first reluctant, journey of self-acceptance and self-assertion that is simultaneously hilarious and inspiring. A Drag is Born is currently part of Playhouse 46's Turn The Lights On! Festival, which presents, in collaboration wit

Review: Give Your Enthusiastic Consent to "A Date With My Wild"

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A Date With My Wild Written and directed by Alexandria Rengifo Presented by Stage Arising at Playhouse 46 at St. Luke's 308 W 46th St., Manhattan, NYC July 7-13, 2024 Photo courtesy of Alexandria Rengifo Would you think that a single performer dancing to the Spice Girls could bring multiple audience members to tears? If you're leaning towards "no," you probably haven't seen Alexandria Rengifo's solo show A Date With My Wild . With engrossingly emotive storytelling and a dancer's sense of movement, Rengifo leads her audience through more than two decades of disconnection from her own body and its potential for pleasure, an experience that can be linked to a much longer history of the surveillance and policing of women's bodies. A Date With My Wild is currently part of Playhouse 46's Turn The Lights On! Festival, which presents, in collaboration with FRIGID New York and the New York City Fringe Festival, 11 shows from this year's Fringe Festiv

News: Choose Your Own Ending in Needs More Work Productions’ Trailblazing "Anti-Gone"

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Photo by Sivan Raz. Editing by Hila Shats. This July, Needs More Work Productions, one of New York City’s leading immersive theater companies, presents Anti-Gone , a one-of-a-kind adaptation of Sophocles’ Greek tragedy Antigone . Join them this summer in Queens to have your say in deciding the famous play’s ending: Should Antigone be pardoned? Ismene crowned Queen Regent of Thebes? Maybe Creon was right all along? This summer, the choice is completely yours. Led by Artistic Director Sivan Raz, Anti-Gone presents an innovative approach to the well-known classic. In the show, a modern acting troupe battles with the strict societal values presented in Antigone . The only way to solve the puzzle is through a complete dismantling of the theatrical form and an honest discussion with you, the audience. Is a happy ending for Antigone’s story possible? Will we be able to find that which has not been found in the 2,500 years since the play’s premiere - a solution? “Antigone was always a play ab

Review: "cunnicularii" Births a Captivating Magical Realist Look at Motherhood

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cunnicularii Written by Sophie McIntosh Directed by Nina Goodheart Presented by Good Apples Collective and Esmé Maria Ng at Alchemical Studios 50 West 17th Street, Manhattan, NYC June 28-July 13, 2024 Camille Umoff. Photo credit: Nina Goodheart Photography In 1726, an English laborer named Mary Toft who lived in Godalming, Surrey, convinced doctors (male, of course), both local and called in from London, that she was giving birth to (dead) rabbits (and some other assorted non-human animal parts). Although this unusual reproductivity was eventually determined to be a deception, Toft's story throws into relief not only the apparatuses of power and knowledge surrounding women's bodies but men's ignorance of those bodies, compounded by patriarchal moralism, joined with their ignoring evidence that maybe these bunnies originated elsewhere than Toft's womb in favor of their own self-advancement. With her fantastic–and fantastical–new play, cunnicularii , Sophie McIntosh, a

Review: Grab a Seat with the "Ladies at a Gay Girls' Bar"

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Ladies at a Gay Girls' Bar, 1938-1969 Choreographed, written, and performed by Maggie Cee Presented by In the Streets Productions at UNDER St. Marks 94 St. Marks Place, Manhattan, NYC June 24 and 29, 2024 Maggie Cee in Ladies at a Gay Girls' Bar. Photo by Olivia Blaidsell. Communal gathering spaces can shape identity while fostering community, and, for queer people, one of those spaces has long been the gay bar. Just how long can be seen in the subtitle of Maggie Cee's solo show Ladies at a Gay Girls' Bar, 1938-1969 (and one can doubtless point to even earlier analogues, such as Eve Adams' Tearoom in 1920s Greenwich Village). With music and dance providing both connective tissue and additional layers of signification, Cee incisively and entertainingly knits voices from these spaces together with the narrative of a quest for self-definition and a call for further excavation of the stories of a certain, underrepresented segment of the lesbian community. Ladies at a

Review: The Power of Art to Calm the Storm in Theater 2020’s "The Tempest"

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The Tempest Written by William Shakespeare Adapted by David Fuller Directed by Judith Jarosz Presented by Theater 2020  at  The Great Room at ART NY (138 South Oxford Street, Brooklyn), June 14-28, 2024, and at Pier One – Brooklyn Bridge Park, June 29-30, 2024* *Note: Pier One dates cancelled due to COVID and weather Center front: David Fuller as Prospero. From left: David Arthur Bachrach, Eileen Glenn, Corey Barron, Kodee Martin, Emma Noelani, Linda Elizabeth, Robert Dyckman, Caryn Hartglass, Lynn Marie Macy, Michael Gnat. Photo by John Hoffman Theater 2020’s delightful 75-minute adaptation of Shakespeare’s The Tempest serves as a timely and powerful reminder that art has the potential not only to mirror reality but even more poignantly to reimagine a better future. Certainly, the future The Tempest proffers is not utopian; the colonized Caliban remains “a thing of darkness” under the control of an only somewhat humbled Prospero. However, the reconciliation of its other characters